Monday, March 27, 2017

I LOVE silk purls


Close view of Cabinet with scenes from the story of Esther (later than 1665), Gift of Irwin Untermyer, 1964.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, Acc. No. 64101.1335
So if you had to ask me which of all the threads we have reproduced in the last ten years is my favorite, I would have to tell you hands down it is the silk purls.  There is nothing else like them and they have such texture and versatility.

Little silk covered silk springs, they can be couched down in long lengths or into short lengths and sewn down so they curve off the surface in humps or loops.

Close view of Cabinet with scenes from the story of Esther (later than 1665), Gift of Irwin Untermyer, 1964.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, Acc. No. 64101.1335
There are many caskets and pictures that are completed almost entirely in silk purls and the effect is magical.  One particular casket really 'trips my trigger' and that is the casket at the MET that I affectionately call the Esther casket.  The top and front are worked in over-the-top stumpwork and then the back is worked in satin stitch - the stitcher deciding not to waste too much time on the part that no-one would see against a wall.  But in between, the right and left sides are worked entirely in silk purls!!  It was a really well thought out transition between the super-relief of the stumpwork and the satin stitched back.  The silk purls that are couched to fill the spaces are high up enough to support the stuffed faces used on the front and top, yet lower in relief to form that bridge between the satin and stumpwork.  It is highly textured and can be stitched in little loops to add a bit more texture and variety.  Note the grass and the amazing leaves on the tree done this way.

Neutrals Family of Tiny Silk Purls
Of course to do things like this, you need many colors.  And in some cases, you need different sizes.  Silk purls came in roughly three sizes; a very large, a medium and a tiny size.  The first size that we brought back was the medium.  It was something we could make with the soie ovale as the base silk and matches that color line.  Then more recently, I started with a tiny silk purl line and produced the most useful colors by themselves - the greens, yellows, olives and browns that could be used for texture in grass and trees.

I will have a set of sides done up like this casket - all in purl work because I LOVE it.  I have photographed the sides of this casket SO much.  But if you look at this casket, you see all kinds of colors in it that are not only part of the pure color series (reds, greens, blues, etc) but also all kinds of
Stone Family of Tiny Silk Purls
'off colors'.  Those colors that are grey, stone, neutrals, slightly purple but not, etc.  The colors that allow you to separate more pure hues.  Think rocks, buildings, linen clothes, etc.  If we had some of these colors, buildings could be made, cool textured rocks in grottos could be done, snails and bugs, think of the potential!

So I am announcing a limited run of 19 NEW colors of tiny silk purls today and adding one new color to the medium silk purl (Clotted Cream - an ivory color).  Not a surprise, but these colors are aimed to match the supplemental colors that were added to the soie perlee family and more...and are based on the foreseen uses of them.
Flame Family of Tiny Silk Purls
I am sure you are thinking... hmm... greens, olives, browns, golds, flame, stones, neutrals...we seem to be missing a few other families of color to round the Tiny Silk Purls out.  You would be right on that.  But who says they aren't already lurking in my storage?  Maybe ready for some other announcement.  Tease Tease Tease.

These are the more limited amounts that I would produce of the valuable 'off colors', those that would serve someone well if they are doing an elaborate stumpwork casket or mirror and I know not everyone is doing that.  If they fly out of here, I will try to get more made.  

Close view of Cabinet with scenes from the story of Esther (later than 1665), Gift of Irwin Untermyer, 1964.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, Acc. No. 64101.1335


Close view of Cabinet with scenes from the story of Esther (later than 1665), Gift of Irwin Untermyer, 1964.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, Acc. No. 64101.1335
Close view of Cabinet with scenes from the story of Esther (later than 1665), Gift of Irwin Untermyer, 1964.  Metropolitan Museum of Art, Acc. No. 64101.1335

6 comments:

  1. Silk purls are great fun to work with, too. I have to admit, though, that Gilt Sylke Twist, much as I hate working with it, has my heart after it's finished. Thank you so much for all the wonderful new/old threads. I just wish they would go on forever!!

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  2. Wow -- Clotted Cream sold out fast! Nothing left by the time I placed my order for the tiny purls. Guess that qualifies as "fly out of here"?

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  3. There is some more on the way - as soon as I have numbers I will reset the store

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  4. Absolutely stunning cabinet I'm looking forward to your talk this Friday.

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  5. Can't see better than this..
    Simply Fabulous..
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  6. This is awesome! How do you have time to do all of these neat things? I am drowning!!! I really enjoy your blog
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